Chapter-a-Day: Judges 15

farm-2796509_1920.jpgJudges 15

Continuing in the theme of reaping what we sow, in this passage, Samson begins to reap what his rash actions sowed. He is the one who set up the riddle, not giving thought to where his future wife’s loyalties rested. When he lost his wager, for the sake of thirty sets of clothing, he stormed off in a rage after paying what he owed. Consequently, the bride’s father chose another groom for her.

Seldom do actions that come in the heat of anger result in anything positive. When we are angry, it’s almost impossible for us to think through all the possible ramifications and make good, positive, and healthy decisions about our best course. Certainly, we’re unlikely to pray about a decision when we are furious, so our decisions definitely won’t be Spirit-led ones.

One of the principles J.D. Greear spoke about in regard to sowing and reaping was “the harvest is greater than the planting.” In Samson’s case, he not only lost his wife to another man, in the end, she and her whole family were killed because of his foolish behavior. Whether we sow good things or bad, the results are multiplied. A tiny act of kindness or generosity results in abundant joy. A single cruel word can follow someone their whole lives with devastating affect.

If we’re honest with ourselves, we all recognize moments when we have sown poorly as a result of our anger, pride, or foolishness. Jesus covered our sin so the eternal consequences are taken away if we’ve trusted in His work on the cross. But we can’t un-sow the seeds we’ve already planted. We can’t change the poor choices we’ve made in the past, but we can move forward planting more wisely in the future.

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